Fact Families and Printable Manipulatives

Discussion in 'Homeschooling' started by gizzy, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. gizzy

    gizzy New Member

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    I'm looking for a MASTER list of fact families in Arithmetic, but haven't had any luck with finding one. I may have to sit down and create one. *sigh*

    Is there such a thing? Can someone post a link or Maybe there is a book with all the fact families, like a teachers resource book?

    I'm trying to get a head start on prepping materials for math in the fall with my "class" of rising 1st graders.

    We're going to work on mastering math, one topic at a time. I'm building the curriculum from the ground up and want to be able to make it as "complete" as possible before the term Starts in August.
     
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  3. jenlaw31

    jenlaw31 New Member

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    Saxon math fact cards might be what you are looking for ??

    I'm in the same boat. I bought a used saxon math set and it didn't have the fact cards with it. I was debating making my own, but it was too tedious. The fact cards sold in most stores don't seem to have all the families :x
     
  4. 2littleboys

    2littleboys Moderator

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  5. gizzy

    gizzy New Member

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    thanks 2littleboys, this is a start, but I was hoping that some where there was a list of the math facts, for me to use to make the materials for my students.

    I'm going to begin working on a list myself, but I'll also keep looking. Anyone else?
     
  6. ochumgache

    ochumgache Active Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean by fact families. Saxon uses that term to teach how one can use three different numbers and create four different addition and subtraction facts. Thus 3,5,8 can be a family, because it can create 3+5=8, 5+3=8, 8-3=5 and 8-5=3. But then there are the fact solving strategies that Saxon teaches. In addition the strategies are doubles, add 0, add 1, add 2, doubles plus 1, add 9, sums of ten and odd balls.
     
  7. gizzy

    gizzy New Member

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    Thats exactly what I mean by fact families ochumgache. I was wondering if there were a "master list" available somewhere. Like, with every possible combination of fact families for numbers up to a certain point, say...15. I dont know for sure.
     
  8. kbabe1968

    kbabe1968 New Member

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    I'll have tod o some digging....there is something, or WAS something out there that did have it. I can't remember where!!!!1 I used it a few years ago when my oldest was in 1st grade.
     
  9. kbabe1968

    kbabe1968 New Member

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  10. 2littleboys

    2littleboys Moderator

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    I made family trees for my son. I printed out a tree template, and then printed out a cherry template (2 cherries joined at the stems). I have (for example) a big number 7 on the tree trunk, and then on the cherry sets of 2, I have 4 & 3, 7 & 0, 6 & 1, and 5 & 2. That way he knows that no matter how he sees the numbers together ... 5-2-7 or 7-3-4 or whatever, they're a family. The smaller two numbers are the same as the big one, so adding or subtracting, the game is the same... "who's missing from the family?"

    Not sure if that helps you or not. I didn't use any cards or anything. I just made it up myself. That might be more work than you have time for, but it's cute to have little trees hanging around the room.

    R&S teaches a similar concept. Rather than writing out every time ... 8+2=10, 2+8=10, 10-2=8, 10-8=2, they just teach "triplets", so 10, 8, and 2 are triplets. They go together no matter whether you're adding or subtracting. Just see which one is missing.
     
  11. Lindina

    Lindina Active Member

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    R&S also has "Bees and Blossoms" posters you cut apart. Each blossom (looks like a huge clover head) has a number on it, and each bee has two numbers with one on each wing. So you can match up, for example: Blossom 12 with bee 2/10, 3/9, 4/8, 5/7, 6/6. Then you can just cover up one number and have the student tell which number is missing.

    Somebody makes triangle shaped flash cards, with triplets, one number in each corner. You show the card with one number covered and the student says what number is missing, adding or subtracting to find out the answer.
     

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