Curriculum for DD with Sensory Processing Disorder

Discussion in 'Homeschooling' started by cincy1, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. cincy1

    cincy1 New Member

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    Hi. I joined the board earlier today. I have a 5 year old daughter who I will be starting in Kindergarten this fall. This past school year, we found out she had Sensory Processing Disorder and type 1 diabetes. It has been a rough year and mostly what I did was just get through it! We sat down and did some of the Bob Jones Pre-Kindergarten on DVDs. However, she really needs to do more this year. I would like to teach her to read and do some math. Do any of you have any suggestions on curriculum that is not time-consuming for me and that would be good for a child who has emotions all over the place due to these two conditions? I also have a 16 year old daughter homeschooling, but she is able to do things on her own. I am out of the loop somewhat about curriculum for little ones, too. :? Thanks!

    Cindy Butler
    husband, Dwight
    daughters Elizabeth,5, and Christina, 16 homeschooled
    daughter, Adrienne,21,college
    son, Greg, 25 on his own!
     
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  3. jacqlyn00

    jacqlyn00 New Member

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    My oldest has SPD and ADHD. I find he likes more hands on activities and not necessarily activities and curriculum that isnt time consuming.
    History, Reading, Timeline etc...We love Winter Promise for now. Lots of crafts and movies scheduled in.
    Math-My son thinks MUS is "ok" hey it's math lol. It doesnt take long and it gets done.
    Language-We are now trying R&S for language and the lessons take all of 5-15 minutes to complete....short and sweet.

    The kids need attention... I'll be back later lol.

    Ok... I think I should add that Noah is gifted too. So just because your child has SPD or ADD doesnt mean they cant learn like the "normal kids" kwim. It just takes a little more effort on my part to keep things interesting.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  4. rmcx5

    rmcx5 New Member

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    Hands-on seems to be the way to go for my friends whose kiddos have sensory issues. You might PM missinseattle....her daughter as sensory integration issues. She doesn't check here as much with her new baby due anytime and they've recently moved and opted to put her DD in the very small public school nearby. But I'm sure she'd be glad to add her 2 cents.

    Rhonda
     
  5. cincy1

    cincy1 New Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions. She does like hands-on activities IF her blood sugar isn't high or IF she isn't in sensory overload. She does alot of drawing, play dough-creative type stuff. She likes computer some, so I was looking at time4learning.

    I was wanting things that were not time-consuming because her diabetes care regimen is detailed and intensive. We do alot of testing, shots, carb-counting... She also goes to an OT for therapy, which takes time out of our week, too.

    Are there any mothers here with a type 1 diabetes child?

    Cindy Butler
     

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