Practical Arts ????

Discussion in 'Homeschooling' started by cherryridgeline, May 12, 2012.

  1. cherryridgeline

    cherryridgeline New Member

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    I am going throught the information i need to provide for my IHIP for next year..... What the heck is Practical Arts....

    I am assuming its things like sewing, but I am clueless on what else it means.... Maybe laundry :D

    I have to provide it for every single quater next year. Yikes....

    Please advise.....
     
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  3. mschickie

    mschickie Active Member

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    You are on the right track. On your IHIP you can just put "a variety of hands on projects" and that will cover practical arts. You do not need a set curriculum for that. For the year you just do things like household repairs, car maintenance, sewing, cooking... you decide and make sure they are learning some of those practical things. You can choose to do a home economics course and that would also cover that but it is easier to just pick out things you want them to learn how to do and teach them as you are doing it.
     
  4. cherryridgeline

    cherryridgeline New Member

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    My children know how to cook..... they can actually make a dinner. Huge mess but they can do it....

    I don't sew.... ahh.... what to do???

    I know they would love wood working but how in the world do you teach something you have no idea about....
     
  5. Munchie33

    Munchie33 New Member

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    Home ec is basically a type of practical arts. Cooking, cleaning, laundry, those sorts of things. It's a good excuse to get your kids to learn how to be fully independent if they need to be.

    If you want actual practical projects, try www.instructables.com. They have all sorts of things, from very easy projects (like a powered boat made from a candle and aluminium foil) that kinder kids could do, to ludicrously hard projects (like making solar panels). It's free, and every project has instructions and photos of what to do for each step. No parent involvement necessary, except to keep an eye on things so they don't get too liberal with scissors and so on.

    My kids make rubber band powered cars, miniature candle hot air balloons, amphibious vehicles, and so on, based on some of the easier projects. It's great for art and physics. Anyway, if you want these sorts of things but aren't sure how to teach them, get your kids browsing this site to find things that interest them.

    And if you really wanted, maybe you could find a friend's parent who knows more about woodwork or sewing to spend an afternoon with them to help them out with the basics. After that they should be fine on their own to create projects.
     
  6. azhomeschooler

    azhomeschooler New Member

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    We saw a woodworking group at our county fair, and they suggested starting with soap carving. Ds gets obsessed over things he hears about, so after a few days, I let him take a bar of soap and a flat-head screw driver and go to town. He created a boat. And, he intentionally chose a bar of ivory because it apparently floats. I have not let him float his boat yet, but he will some day soon when he is ready to let it go (I warned him that once it is wet, it will start to disolve). Just a thought since you mentioned woodworking.
     
  7. mschickie

    mschickie Active Member

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    Do not worrry about doing anything fancy. When you have home repairs (toilet breaks, leaky faucet....) you include them in doing the repair. Does dh do his own oil changes on the car, have the kids help out and learn how to do it. If you want sewing have them take a class at JoAnns. Do you want a room painted, show the kids how and have them do it? Do you have an organizational project, well put them to work on it. This does not have to be fancy.

    If you really are interested in woodworking, Christian Light has a begining woodworking textbook you could work through if you wanted. You could also do lessons at Adirondac Folk School http://www.adirondackfolkschool.org/index.php/courses/by-theme/traditional-crafts/ I think they are about 1hr away for you but if you did a Sat. class it might work out well for you.
     
  8. TeacherMom

    TeacherMom New Member

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    woodworking is easy. You can watch Youtube videos about making things.
    Today you can type in how to make bla bla blah and it will bring up a ton of information.
     
  9. Koko Academy

    Koko Academy New Member

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  10. mschickie

    mschickie Active Member

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    Home Depot and Lowes, I forgot about them. They are a great resource.
     
  11. Emma's#1fan

    Emma's#1fan Active Member

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    When I took Home Ec in 9th grade, we learned how to make a variety of shakes, salads, cleaning skills, basic sewing, and house management...basically things that a parent should be teaching their child anyways. Wood crafts was a completely different department. This is probably why they call it Practical Arts instead of Home Ec because you are covering more than house skills. I never heard of Practical Arts until today.
     
  12. Koko Academy

    Koko Academy New Member

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    Thanks for sharing the website www.instructables.com. What a great resource. I am going to have my boys do several of these projects over the summer!
     
  13. fairfarmhand

    fairfarmhand New Member

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    sewing buttons, hemming clothing, ironing, laundry.

    I'd also add in meal planning, budgeting, grocery shopping, paying bills (let your kids do this. They will learn why you are always yelling about leaving the sink on and the lights on! They will also really understand when you say, We can't afford it!)

    Putting gas in the car, checking the oil and tires. cutting grass, home maintenance like changing air filters in the AC.
     

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